Thursday, January 31, 2019

Plfuger Medalist MEDX 5/6 Review


The Plfueger Medalist is considered to be one of the most iconic and classic fly reels of all time. The Medalist is well-known to be a tough, reliable, and great performing click-and-pawl reel. Revisions of this reel have been in production for generations and as the saying goes, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." I'm not much of a gear collector but I do enjoy things that come with an interesting history.

After hearing all the wonderful things about the reel I purchased one for myself to see if Medalist truly lived up to its name.


Monday, January 28, 2019

Fly Tying: Prince Nymph


The prince nymph is a classic pattern that I never had confidence in until I started catching fish after fish on it. It is a great attractor pattern that can imitate a variety of aquatic insects making it one of the most versatile flies ever created. There are many iterations of this pattern however my favorite is the classic with the brown hackle, peacock herl, and white goose biot.


Thursday, January 24, 2019

Winter Time On Big Chico Creek


Big Chico Creek a tributary of the Sacramento River that shares a common trait with many of the Sac's other tributaries in that it is open to fishing throughout the winter. The lower portion of the creek is open until February 15th and the upper portion above Bear Hole is open until April 15th. Big Chico Creek serves as an endangered spring chinook and central valley steelhead spawning ground making it an important watershed for salmonids.

Despite living in Chico for nearly five years I never took the time to try and fish the creek during the winter. With limited options due to high and muddy flows I decided to kill my curiosity and spent the day fishing Big Chico Creek.


Saturday, January 19, 2019

Visiting My Favorite Winter Fisheries


Winter can be a tough time of year to fishing due to the weather and streams being closed but where ever there are rivers or streams open I take the opportunity explore and fish. The Lower Yuba and Feather are the rivers I spend the most time fishing during the winter. Both rivers are about thirty minutes away and I have, for the most part, figured out their winter patterns and secrets. I will often try to make a few trips a bit further up north to fish Butte Creek for the solitude and possible wild steelhead. There's always somewhere to fish here in Northern California!


Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Heritage Trout Challenge: Through The Coast and Mountains



In 2018 I completed my first California Heritage Trout challenge. This journey was by far one of the most memorable fly fishing experiences of last year. I encourage all fly anglers in the great state of California to take the challenge and experience it for yourself. Not only do you get the feeling of accomplishment as an angler, you also get an amazing certificate and an awesome old man hat.


Monday, January 14, 2019

Fly Tying: Zebra Midge


Midges are a primary food source for trout that are perhaps one of most easiest insects to imitate through fly patterns. Midge larvae can come in all different sizes and colors however they often share the same shape making patterns quick and easy to modify.
The zebra midge is the most basic fly pattern used to imitate midge larvae. Tied with only black thread, silver wire, and a silver beadhead this simple but effective pattern is an absolute must-have in every fly box.



Thursday, January 10, 2019

Fly Tying: San Juan Worm


The San Juan Worm is a classic fly pattern that imitates the greatest fish catching bait of all time, the mighty earthworm. This is a simple pattern that tends to produce fish after a fresh rain spell or when fishing discolored water. During or after a rain event worms will often come out of the ground in efforts to find a new home however more often than not many don't survive and end up becoming food. Aquatic worms that fish feed on are also perfectly imitated through this pattern. Many anglers will tell you that a San Juan Worm isn't a fly but to me if it's tied onto a hook I consider it a fly.